Adult Mental Health

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Here at Beacon House we have a number of highly experienced chartered adult psychologists and psychotherapists who are able to work with a wide range of emotional, relationship and mental health difficulties.

We have close links with two consultant psychiatrists who we liaise with when a team approach is helpful for the client. This dual approach can be especially beneficial when the client is considering medication alongside psychological therapy, and when the client has thoughts of harming themselves.

Alongside our specialist trauma clinic; we provide evidence-based treatments for the following difficulties:

Depression Anxiety OCD Panic Occasional low mood Post-natal depression Bi polar disorder Feelings of emptiness Loss and bereavement Loss of direction Fear of abandonment and rejection Conflict and instability in reationships Work related stress Poor sense of identity Low self-esteem Unexplained body sensations and pain Anger management Impulsivity Feeling overwhelmed by emotions Dissocation
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We offer a flexible and dynamic treatment clinic for adults. After the initial assessment appointment the client will be matched to the most appropriate therapist within the team; and within the first two to three therapy sessions a therapy plan will be discussed and agreed between the client and the therapist.

Short term and long term therapy is available at Beacon House. Some individuals coming to therapy develop clear and discrete goals to reduce their distress; and they achieve these within a time-limited piece of work. For others, therapy is about exploring their personal development and understanding their unique potential within an open-ended therapeutic relationship.

Therapeutic approaches available here include:

EMDR

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EMDR is a psychotherapy that enables people to heal from emotional distress that is the result of disturbing life experiences.

EMDR is a powerful and very effective therapy for a range of traumatic events, and it is also used to help broader difficulties such as depression; low self-esteem, anxiety and relationship problems.

At the time of a traumatic or stressful event strong emotions interfere with our ability to completely process the experience – and bad memories can become ‘frozen in time’. When that distressing event is remembered, it can feel like the person is re-living it all over again because the smells, sounds and images still feel as real as they did when the traumatic event or events happened.

EMDR psychotherapy works by ‘unfreezing’ the traumatic memories, enabling the person to resolve them. Over time the disturbing memory and associated beliefs and feelings become digested and worked through until the person is able to think about the event without re-living it. The memory is still there, but it is far less upsetting and no longer has such a big impact on the client’s quality of life.

EMDR is often seen as a therapeutic technique used as part of a broader psychotherapy, rather than a treatment in its own right.

For more information on EMDR visit www.emdrassociation.org.uk.

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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

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CBT is an effective treatment for difficulties such as depression and anxiety. It can help an individual make sense of overwhelming problems by breaking them down into smaller parts. This makes it easier to see how they are connected and how they are negatively affecting a person’s thoughts, feelings, behaviours and bodily sensations.

CBT believes that how a person thinks about a problem can affect how they feel physically and emotionally. When having CBT, the client is asked to describe their specific goals; and a number of different techniques are used to chip away at the strength of the negative beliefs that the person holds about themselves and about the way the world works. By changing these negative beliefs to more balanced ones, the person will experience a change in their feelings and behaviour.

CBT has a wealth of evidence to show that it is highly effective talking treatment. Within the Beacon House team we have a number of practitioners who are experts in working within a CBT approach.

For more information on CBT visit www.babcp.com.

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Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT)

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Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT) was developed by Marsha Linehan originally for individuals with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Individuals with a diagnosis of BPD often have particular difficulty with regulating emotions; managing distress and also in managing the complexities of interpersonal relationships.

In Stage One of treatment, DBT offers a range of ways to address these specific difficulties. As individuals with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder often have a background of early traumatic events, DBT helps the individual during stage one of the therapy to learn skills to manage difficult emotions and/or self-destructive behaviour in order to both prepare them for working with these early traumatic events and to improve their wellbeing and day to day life. DBT in Stage One would normally be provided through group therapy which focusses on the following skills: mindfulness; distress tolerance; emotion regulation; and interpersonal effectiveness. This group therapy would take place alongside the client having their own one-to-one therapy.

DBT is not officially recognised as DBT without an individual being in both group and individual treatment. Beacon House currently offers DBT skills teaching in individual therapy rather than in a group setting. We therefore offer individual therapy informed by DBT and if there is the demand, we are able to offer the group therapy alongside the individual therapy.

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Sensorimotor psychotherapy

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Sensorimotor psychotherapy is an effective treatment for relieving and resolving the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and many other emotional and physical trauma-related health problems that comes with complex trauma. This therapeutic approach focusses on the client’s body sensations by working directly with the physiological elements. It uses the body (rather than thoughts or emotion) as a primary entry point which in turn facilitates emotional and cognitive processing. Sensorimotor psychotherapy is especially beneficial for working with dissociation, emotional reactivity or flat affect, frozen states or hyperarousal and other trauma-related symptoms.
For more information visit: www.sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org

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Lifespan integration therapy

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Lifespan Integration relies on the innate ability of the body-mind to heal itself. This approach is body-based, and combines active imagination, the juxtaposition of ego states in time, and a visual time line of memories to facilitate neural integration and rapid healing. During the integrating phase of the protocol, the client ‘views’ a memory image for each year of his or her life. The Lifespan Integration technique causes memories to surface spontaneously, and because of how memories are held neurologically, each memory which surfaces is related to the emotional theme or issue being targeted. The resulting panoramic view of the client’s life gives the client new insights about lifelong patterns resultant from the past trauma.
For more information visit: www.lifespanintegration.com

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Narrative therapy

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Narrative therapy is a collaborative and non-pathologizing approach to therapy which centers clients as the experts of their own lives. A narrative approach views problems as separate from people and sees clients as having many skills, abilities, values, commitments, beliefs and competencies that will support them to change their relationship with the problems influencing their lives.

Stories in a ‘narrative therapy’ context emerge as certain events are privileged and selected out over other events as more important or true. As the story takes shape, it invites the client to further select only certain information while other events become neglected and thus the same story is continually told. As this process unfolds, the client’s old ‘problem-saturated’ story about themselves changes and is re-constructed to something hopeful. This approach can be used creatively with adults, children and families.

For more information visit: www.narrativeapproaches.com/

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Psychodynamic therapy

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Psychodynamic therapy is based on the idea that a person’s problems are at least partly outside of their awareness, in other words in their ‘unconscious’. In psychodynamic therapy emotional difficulties are understood to develop early in life and often within the person’s relationships with their parents. Eventually these early experiences cause difficulties in day to day living. Psychodynamic therapy focuses on revealing and resolving these ‘unconscious conflicts’.

The relationship between the therapist and the client is seen as a central place to understand and work through the difficulties that the client has in his or her every day relationships.

This way of working can be used with children in a playful way, drawing on the child’s use of art, drama, sand and play.

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Solution focused therapy

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Solution focused therapy focuses on what the client would like to achieve rather than on the problems that made them seek help in the first place. This therapy does not focus on the past, but instead, focuses on the present and future. Solution focussed therapy uses ‘respectful curiosity’ to encourage the client to imagine their preferred future, and then together the therapist and client can start noticing any small steps towards it. Solution focussed therapy draws on questions about the client’s story, their strengths and resources, and times when the problems have not been so bad. This approach tends to be brief, and can be used for individuals, couples or families.
For more information visit: https://www.brief.org.uk/

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Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Jungian Psychotherapy and Jungian Psychoanalysis

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Jungian Analysis is the psychotherapeutic approach of Analytical Psychology where the psychotherapist and client work together to bring unconscious elements of their emotional states into a more balanced relationship with conscious awareness and experience. Jungian psychotherapy and analysis strives to discover meaning, facilitate maturation of the personality, improve mental health and provide relief to psychological suffering. This way of working explores the personal unconscious meaning in the images and patterns that arise in an individual’s dreams, fantasies, memories, developmental history, creative expressions and the events of daily life. Jungian psychotherapy works with the relational dynamics in the here-and-now relationship between the therapist and the client.

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Mentalisation Based Treatment

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Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT) is a form of psychotherapy that was originally designed to help individuals with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder, or difficulties that fit with this diagnosis (Click here for information about the Beacon House Personality Disorder Service). We now know that MBT can be useful for any adult or adolescent who struggles with emotional instability, uncertain sense of self, and difficulties in relationships with other people.

‘Mentalizing’ is the ability to understand the meaning of behaviour (of others, and of ourselves), by understanding the thoughts and feelings that motivate the behaviour. Some individuals who have experienced trauma or challenges during the early years of their lives find this very difficult. MBT is centered around improving this ability. By beginning to understand other peoples’ thoughts and feelings, you can better understand why people behave in the ways that they do, and also become more tuned in to your own emotions, thoughts, and needs.

The objectives of MBT are increased stability in your emotional state, better control over your behaviours, happier and more fulfilling relationships with other people, and an improved capacity to pursue your life goals.

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Systemic Family Therapy

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Family Therapy – or to give it its full title, Family and Systemic Psychotherapy – helps people in a close relationship help each other. It enables family members, couples and others who care about each other to express and explore difficult thoughts and emotions safely; to understand each other’s experiences and views; appreciate each other’s needs; build on strengths and make useful changes in their relationships and their lives. Individuals can also find Family Therapy helpful as an opportunity to reflect on important relationships and find ways forward.

Family Therapy creates a safe space to enable people to talk, together or individually, often about difficult or distressing issues, in ways that respect their experiences and invite engagement and support recovery. It is a relational process and it is important that everyone in the family is ready and willing to engage in thinking about change.

Research shows Family Therapy is useful for children, young people, adults and older adults experiencing a wide range of difficulties and circumstances including couple relationship difficulties; child and adult mental health issues; the effects of trauma; parenting struggles; illness and disability; eating disorders; fostering, adoption and the needs of Looked After Children; self-harm; and issues related to life cycle changes. A leaflet about Family Therapy can be downloaded here.

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